Of Squash and JP Drains

This evening we made a delicious butternut squash soup that our friend Lisa sent in a box – squash, spices, coconut milk and all. Tasty and fairly easy! The only hard part for me was preparing the squash by getting the seeds out. I hate trying to scoop the stringy gunk and tiny seeds out of the hard squash out with a spoon. It just feels yucky to me, fighting the squash to wrest out the slimy vegetable “entrails.”

I know, I know, it’s a vegetable. How bad can it be? But it IS! I remember my parents doing this to pumpkins in my childhood and I thought it was gross then too! Squash and pumpkin innards have this smell I associate with decay.

Once they’re cooked, I have no problem. Sweet, plush, carmelized squash. Soft as butter. Purees like a dream. But when they are hard with a slimy mess of stringy membranes and seeds… shudder.

You know what I don’t mind? JP drains. Little grenade-shaped shells of plastic connected by tubing to people’s insides, draining all kinds of fluids. Fine, I won’t describe exactly what they drain. But I don’t mind emptying those things. Doesn’t bother me a bit.

Hopefully people who turn pumpkin into pumpkin puree all day feel the same way about that as I feel about JP drains.

And this relates to Lent how, you ask? Well, I’d like to think it has to do wth “vocation” or calling. I am called to be a nurse, to care for people. To empty JP drains. Other people, presumably, are called to be squash de-seeders. (Or perhaps supervise the machines that de-seed squash). Others to be teachers, others to be pastors…

You get my drift. We all do things that other people find inconceivable because they are ours to do.